Past Events

[PhD Thesis Presentation] -Lashmi Piriya Ananda Babu- Functional roles of microtubules in a giant presynaptic terminal

2018-03-20
C700, Level C, Lab3

Speaker: Lashmi Piriya Ananda Babu

Title: Functional roles of microtubules in a giant presynaptic terminal

 

Seminar by Dr. Henrique von Gersdorff from Vollum Institute, Oregon Health & Science University

2018-03-19
B503, Level B, Lab 1

Speaker: Dr. Henrique von Gersdorff from Vollum Institute, Oregon Health & Science University

OIST Graduation Ceremony 2017

2018-02-24
OIST Auditorium

Attendance is by invitation only. For details, please see the OIST Graduation Ceremony 2017 website.

[seminar] Split energy cascade in turbulent thin fluid layers by Dr. Stefano Musacchio, Universite' de Nice Sophia-Antipolis

2018-02-22
C014, Lab1

Speaker: Dr. Stefano Musacchio, Universite' de Nice Sophia-Antipolis

Titile: Split energy cascade in turbulent thin fluid layers

2018 1st Admissions Workshop

2018-02-13 to 2018-02-15

Selection workshop for students seeking admission to the OIST PhD program in 2018

[Seminar TODAY] Atomtronics and cavity QED experiments in Auckland.

2018-01-22
C209, Center Building

I will discuss two experiments at the University of Auckland. In the first experiment we consider a two dimensional Bose gas in an "atomtronic" circuit. We will look at the effects of Anderson localization and of quantum turbulence. 

In the second experiment we consider an optical nanofiber, which is part of a fiberoptic ring resonator, interacting with atoms in a MOT. We see strong coupling between atoms and photons, and show saturation of the system for 13 photons in the resonator.

 

Dr. Hooglerland's expertised field

My research is been centered around the interaction and correspondence between light and matter, and the application of its principles to other areas of research. At low temperatures, matter can be made to behave much like light, i.e., best described by waves. In its interaction with such matter, light can behave like it is composed of particles. Laser cooling and trapping forms a key technique in understanding this interplay. I apply these cooling and trapping techniques to experimental research areas of fundamental atomic physics, quantum chaos, quantum information, and atom lasers. From this research emerges a deeper understanding of the quantum world, which determines in turn what happens in the world around us. Spin-offs from this research I am involved with are improved spectroscopic techniques, laser techniques, interferometric high-precision measurements and atomic beam applications.

More up-to-date information can be found on my group website http://qilab.phy.auckland.ac.nz

(Cited from the website of University of Auckland)

Pages