Teaching and Mentoring

 

Teaching and mentoring our students, colleagues, peers in difficult times

The following resources are provided to guide the members of the OIST community in supporting our students and each other during challenging times and situations. While some of them are contextualized in teaching settings, the guidelines and practices are applicable to a wide range of situations in the lab, workplace, and in social settings.

Difficult moments

Self-care resources

Trauma-informed approach to teaching and mentoring

A trauma-informed approach to teaching and mentoring, based on the original principles developed by Fallot and Harris (the pioneers of trauma-informed care) can help teachers, mentors, and managers to support students, peers, and colleagues during highly challenging times (Fallot & Harris, 2006; Carello, 2020).

PHYSICAL, EMOTIONAL, SOCIAL, AND ACADEMIC SAFETY

Efforts are made to create an atmosphere that is respectful of the need for safety, respect, and acceptance for all students, faculty, and staff in both individual and group interpersonal interactions, including feeling safe to make and learn from mistakes.

TRUSTWORTHINESS AND TRANSPARENCY

Trust and transparency are enhanced by making expectations clear, ensuring consistency in practice, maintaining appropriate boundaries, and minimizing disappointment.

SUPPORT AND CONNECTION

Individuals and groups are connected with appropriate peer and professional resources to help them succeed academically, personally, and professionally.

COLLABORATION AND MUTUALITY

Opportunities exist to provide input, share power, and make decisions. Individuals and groups act as allies rather than as adversaries to reach common goals.

EMPOWERMENT, VOICE, AND CHOICE

Individuals and groups are empowered to make choices and to develop confidence and competence.

CULTURAL, HISTORICAL, AND GENDER ISSUES

Individuals and groups strive to be responsive to historical, cultural, and gender issues in order to respect one another’s diverse experiences and identities.

RESILIENCE, GROWTH, AND CHANGE

Strengths and resilience are emphasized over deficiencies and pathology. Feedback is provided to convey optimism and to facilitate growth and change.

References (please also refer to original sources on linked webpages above).

  1. Bowen, E.A., & Murshid, N.S. (2016). Trauma-Informed social policy: A conceptual framework for policy analysis and advocacy. Perspectives from the Social Sciences, 106(2), 223-229.
  2. Butler, L. D., Carello, J., & Maguin, E. (2017). Trauma, stress, and self-care in clinical training: Predictors of burnout, decline in health status, secondary traumatic stress symptoms, and compassion satisfaction. Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, 9(4), 416-424.
  3. Carello, J. (2020) Trauma-informed teaching & learning in times of crisis. Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuRxxPK9Hyc
  4. Fallot, R.D. & Harris,M. (2006). Trauma-informed services: A self-assessment and planning protocol. Washington, DC: Community Connections. Retrieved from

https://www.theannainstitute.org/CCTICSELFASSPP.pdf

  1. Huston, T. A., & DiPietro, M. (2007). In the eye of the storm: Students’ perceptions of helpful faculty actions following a collective tragedy. In D. R. Robertson & L. B. Nilson (Eds.), To improve the academy (pp. 207-224). Bolton, MA: Anker Publishing.

 

Please find attached links to some resources on wellbeing during difficult times below: