Upcoming Events

Seminar "New life for old bones - medical aDNA research"

Monday, March 25, 2019 - 14:00 to 15:00
C016, Lab 1
Seminar

Seminar by Prof. Krause-Kyora (Institute of Clinical Molecular Biology, Kiel University)

Seminar by Dr Yong Yang 'Group delay and its dispersion in SNAP resonators'

Monday, March 25, 2019 - 16:00 to 17:00
C209, Level C, Centre Building
Seminar

Speaker: Dr Yong Yang, Senior Research Fellow, Aston University, UK

"Network architecture underlying sparse neural activity characterized by structured higher-order interactions", Hideaki Shimazaki, Kyoto University

Tuesday, March 26, 2019 - 13:00 to 14:00
Meeting Room C016 - L1 Bldg
Seminar

Dr. Hideaki Shimazaki, Program-specific Associate Professor at Kyoto University

Skill Pill: Intro to Programming - 3 of 4

Tuesday, March 26, 2019 - 15:00 to 17:00
B701, Computer Lab, Lab3
Research

This Skill Pill will focus on teaching the basics of computer programming, using the language of Python.

Anyone welcome.

More information and signup here.

[Seminar] "Learning to navigate in dynamic environments"

Tuesday, March 26, 2019 - 15:00 to 16:00
Lab 1, C016
Seminar

[Seminar] "Learning to navigate in dynamic environments" @C016 Lab 1

Speaker - Dr. Antonio Celani, Research Scientist, Quantitative Life Sciences

The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics ICTP

[Geometry, Topology and Dynamics Seminar] Global manifolds and the transition to chaos in the Lorenz system by Dr. Bernd Krauskopf (University of Auckland)

Tuesday, March 26, 2019 - 15:00 to 16:00
Lab 3, B700
Seminar

The Lorenz system still fascinates many people because of the simplicity of the equations that generate such complicated dynamics on the famous butterfly attractor. This talk addresses the role of the stable and unstable manifolds in organising the dynamics more globally. A main object of interest is the stable manifold of the origin of the Lorenz system, also known as the Lorenz manifold. This two-dimensional manifold and associated manifolds of saddle periodic orbits can be computed accurately with numerical methods based on the continuation of orbit segments, defined as solutions of suitable two-point boundary value problems. We use these techniques to give a precise geometrical and topological characterisation of global manifolds during the transition from simple dynamics, via preturbulence to chaotic dynamics, as the Rayleigh parameter of the Lorenz system is increased; joint work with Hinke Osinga (University of Auckland) and Eusebius Doedel (Concordia University, Montreal). 

 

[Course] Quantum Models for Black Holes: Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev and generalizations by Prof. Frank Ferrari (Univ. Libre de Bruxelles)

Wednesday, March 27, 2019 - 11:00 to 12:00
B717, Lab 3
Research

Title of the course: Quantum Models for Black Holes: Sachdev-Ye-Kitaev and generalizations

Aim: To introduce recently developed ideas and techniques on the SYK models and generalizations.

Dynamic regulation of inhibition of T cell activation

Wednesday, March 27, 2019 - 13:00 to 14:00
C016 (Lab1, Level C)
Seminar

"Dr. Takashi Saito, Team Leader, RIKEN. Language: English, no interpretation."

Skill Pill: Intro to Programming - 4 of 4

Wednesday, March 27, 2019 - 15:00 to 17:00
B701, Computer Lab, Lab3
Research

This Skill Pill will focus on teaching the basics of computer programming, using the language of Python.

Anyone welcome.

More information and signup here.

[Geometry, Topology and Dynamics Seminar] Robust chaos: a tale of blenders, their computation, and their destruction by Dr. Hinke Osinga (University of Auckland)

Wednesday, March 27, 2019 - 16:00 to 17:00
Lab 3, B700
Seminar

A blender is an intricate geometric structure of a three- or higher-dimensional diffeomorphism. Its characterising feature is that its invariant manifolds behave as geometric objects of a dimension that is larger than expected from the dimensions of the manifolds themselves. We introduce a family of three-dimensional Hénon-like maps and study how it gives rise to an explicit example of a blender. The map has two saddle fixed points. Their associated stable and unstable manifolds consist of points for which the sequence of images or pre-images converges to one of the saddle points; such points lie on curves or surfaces, depending on the number of stable eigenvalues of the Jacobian at the saddle points. We employ advanced numerical techniques to compute one-dimensional stable and unstable manifolds to very considerable arclengths. In this way, we not only present the first images of an actual blender but also obtain a convincing numerical test for the blender property. This allows us to present strong numerical evidence for the existence of the blender over a larger parameter range, as well as its disappearance and geometric properties beyond this range. We will also discuss the relevance of the blender property for chaotic attractors; joint work with Stephanie Hittmeyer and Bernd Krauskopf (University of Auckland) and Katsutoshi Shinohara (Hitotsubashi University).

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