[Webinar] Extreme Events & Climate Change

Date

Friday, November 19, 2021 - 09:00 to 10:00

Location

Zoom link will be provided upon registration

Description

In the last few years, the social and economical impact of extreme weather events on society and economy has been increasing significantly and receiving lots of attention by the media, social media and public in general. In this talk, Dr. Suzana Camargo at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, will give an overview of the current state of knowledge on the relationship between extreme weather and climate events and anthropogenic climate change. She will present a general overview on various types of extreme events, but provide special attention to hurricanes and typhoons. She will discuss the current trends of extreme events, the attribution of specific extreme events to climate change, as well as the projections for the end of the century.

Suzana J. Camargo is the Marie Tharp Lamont Research Professor at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. She has been working at Columbia University since 1999, first at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society before joining the Ocean and Climate Physics Division of the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Dr. Camargo was born in Brazil, where she received her B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Physics at the University of São Paulo (USP). She then moved to Germany, where she received a Ph.D. in Physics at the Technical University of Munich. She was a postdoctoral research scientist at the Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics and an Associate Professor at the São Paulo State University (Unesp). Dr. Camargo has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals on various aspects of climate, in particular the relationship of tropical cyclones and climate in various time-scales.

This event is part of the OIST Foundation’s Future of Climate Webinar Series.

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