Coordination Chemistry and Catalysis Unit (Julia Khusnutdinova)

Front row (left to right): Chika Azama, Shubham Deolka, Julia Khusnutdinova, Pradnya Patil, Luca Nencini; 

Back row: Abhishek Dubey, Orestes Rivada-Wheelaghan, Eugene Khaskin, Georgy Filonenko, Sebastien Lapointe

Our group is interested in developing transition metal complexes with modular properties controlled through ligand design (photoluminescent properties, redox reactivity). Eventually, we plan to use these properties in the design of new stimuli-responsive polymers.

We also work on developing homogeneous catalysts for reactions relevant to renewable energy production (e.g. carbon dioxide reduction to liquid fuel) and environmentally benign, “green” transformations.

Read more about our research...

Latest Posts

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  • DLA, Electroplating and oscillating reaction lab

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