Past Events

[Seminar] Temperate carbonate reefs, 'blue carbon' and the 'plastisphere'

2022年12月6日 (火) 11:00 12:00
OIST Seminar room Lab4 L4E01

 

This talk will introduce two major forms of cold-water biogenic habitats.   Deep-sea coral reefs are extensive in the NE Atlantic region due to high food availability and high carbonate saturation levels.  Maerl beds are calcified seaweed habitats and are the oldest biogenic habitat type found in shallow waters of the region. (...)

[Seminar] Enhancing detection of pest species using environmental DNA/RNA in biosecurity

2022年10月26日 (水) 13:00 14:00
OIST Seminar room L4F01 (Lab 4)

Speaker: Dr Alejandro Trujillo-Gonzalez, Principal Scientist, National eDNA Reference Centre, University of Canberra, Canberra, ACT, Australia

Hosted by: Dr. Roger Huerlimann, OIST Marine Climate Change Unit

Abstract: Globalisation is increasing the rate and complexity of trade connections between countries. This increasing network of interactions, in hand with the movement of both people and goods, puts countries at risk of invasive pests and diseases, constraining their capacity to protect economic, ecological, and social livelihood. Tackling the increasing influx of invasive pests and pathogens requires the use of biosecurity measures within diverse methodologies used to detect, eradicate, and minimize the inherent risks of these unwanted species. (...)

[Seminar] Comparative analysis of the cobia (Rachycentron canadum) genome identifies ephx1 as a novel putative master sex-determining gene in teleosts

2022年9月15日 (木) 14:00 15:00
OIST Seminar room C210

Speaker: Dr Xueyan Shen, Senior Lecturer Aquaculture Institute, James Cook University Singapore.

Hosted by: Dr. Roger Huerlimann, OIST Marine Climate Change Unit

Abstract:

Cobia (Rachycentron canadum) is the only member of the Rachycentridae family and exhibits considerable sexual dimorphism in growth rate. Sex determination in teleosts has been a long-standing basic biological question. The molecular mechanisms of sex determination/differentiation in cobia species is completely unknown. We reported high-quality, chromosome-level genome sequences of male cobia with a genome assembly size of 586.51 Mb (contig/scaffold N50: 86.0 kb/24.3 Mb) and female cobia, 583.88 Mb (79.9 kb/22.5 Mb). (...)

[Seminar] The R&D pathway to growing aquaculture through innovative technologies

2022年9月12日 (月) 14:00 15:00
OIST Meeting room L4F01

Speaker: Professor Dean R. Jerry, Tropical Futures Institute, James Cook University Singapore, Australian Research Council Hub for Supercharging Tropical Aquaculture through Genetic Solutions, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia.

Hosted by: Dr. Roger Huerlimann, OIST Marine Climate Change Unit

Abstract: As the farming of aquaculture species matures the industry is progressively adopting innovation to increase productivity and lower risk due to disease and environmental perturbations. Technologies based on artificial intelligence and machine learning, rapid diagnostics, biosensors, and integration of genomic data are being developed in efforts to obtain precise information on the health and well-being of the cultured species, along with allowing finer-scale management of the production system. (...)

[Seminar] When does taxonomy matter?

2022年8月29日 (月) 11:00 12:00
Lab4 L4F01 Seminar Room

Speaker: Professor Andrew Baird, Chief Investigator in the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies at James Cook University

Hosted by: Professor Timothy Ravasi, OIST Marine Climate Change Unit

Abstract: Molecular approaches have revolutionised our understanding of the systematics and evolution of most branches on the tree of life, including corals. Over the last twenty-five years molecular research has revealed that few of the 18 families and 111 genera recognised by Veron (2000) were monophyletic. New techniques and vision promise a more robust and consistent species level taxonomy, but it will take time and there is always likely to be some uncertainty. It is therefore important to establish when taxonomy matters and when it does not. (...)

[Seminar] The neurobiological effects of ocean acidification on a cephalopod

2022年8月9日 (火) 14:00 15:00
Center Building C210

Speaker: Jodi Thomas, ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD Australia.

Hosted by: Professor Timothy Ravasi, OIST Marine Climate Change Unit

Abstract: The uptake of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) by the ocean is causing seawater CO2 levels to rise, changing ocean chemistry in a process known as ocean acidification (OA). OA can affect a variety of physiological processes, life history traits and behaviours of fish and marine invertebrates. As invertebrates comprise the vast majority of marine diversity, are essential for key ecosystem processes and support human livelihoods, OA-induced effects of marine invertebrates could have ecological, social and economic consequences.(...)

[Seminar] Rise of the turfs: the simplification of marine ecosystems under ocean acidification by Dr. Ben Harvey, Tsukuba University

2021年12月9日 (木) 13:30 15:00
Lab4 L4F01 Seminar Room

Speaker: Dr. Ben P. Harvey, Assistant Professor at the Shimoda Marine Research Center, University of Tsukuba

Hosted by: Professor Timothy Ravasi, OIST Marine Climate Change Unit

Abstract: Human activities are rapidly changing the structure of coastal marine ecosystems, but the ecological consequences of these changes remain uncertain. Natural analogues of futuristic conditions are increasingly being used to assess the likely effects of rising atmospheric CO2 emissions on marine ecosystems. (...)

[Seminar] "Coral reef fish in a changing world: evolutionary potential and ecological limitations" by Philip L. Munday and Jennifer M. Donelson

2019年11月13日 (水) 15:00 16:00
Lab 1 D014

[SEMINAR]

"Coral reef fish in a changing world: evolutionary potential and ecological limitations"

Philip L. Munday and Jennifer M. Donelson

ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD Australia.

Many short-term experiments have demonstrated the potential impacts of ocean warming and acidification on marine organisms. However, longer-term experiments are needed to test the capacity for acclimation and adaptation to these stressors. In this talk we will describe unique multigenerational experiments being used to test the effects of warming and acidification on coral reef fishes and explore their capacity for thermal plasticity and adaptation.(...)