Date

Wednesday, February 9, 2022 - 15:00

Casual discussion group based on pre-recorded theoretical ecology talks; all welcome! This week: Vadim Karatayev (University of Guleph). Species heterogeneity can reduce the potential for alternative stable states in food webs.

Date

Tuesday, February 15, 2022 - 09:00 to 10:00

PhD Thesis Public Presentation

Date

Wednesday, December 8, 2021 - 12:10 to 12:50

Living electronics and fate of plastics

 

Organic electronics is a rising field, with novel applications including but not limited to stretchable solar cells, flexible display screens, and biosensors. The high performance of these organic electronics is enabled by the outstanding optoelectronic and thermomechanical features of organic semiconducting materials. As the field has progressed, bioelectronics has attracted increasing interest. Bioelectronics, merging manufactured electronics and biology, has emerged as a promising platform for translating electronic signals into ionic ones and vice versa, converting ionic signals into electronic signals (e.g., biosensors and ionic skins). As a result, in recent years, applications in tissue engineering, drug delivery, electrophoresis and physiology have been developed. As we look into the future of bioelectronics, “living” electronics that merge the synthetic and biological world, holds some interest.

Separate to the above, microplastics composed of various plastic and polymeric materials pose as a major global environmental issue that can cause detrimental consequences to marine organisms and across the food chain. We have been collaborating with researchers at UW to identify microplastics in marine organisms in the Puget Sound and have identified that not all organisms consume the same microplastics.

In both projects, we seek to initiate collaborations with those at OIST and look forward to initiating discussions with various units.  

Living electronics and fate of plastics

 

Organic electronics is a rising field, with novel applications including but not limited to stretchable solar cells, flexible display screens, and biosensors. The high performance of these organic electronics is enabled by the outstanding optoelectronic and thermomechanical features of organic semiconducting materials. As the field has progressed, bioelectronics has attracted increasing interest. Bioelectronics, merging manufactured electronics and biology, has emerged as a promising platform for translating electronic signals into ionic ones and vice versa, converting ionic signals into electronic signals (e.g., biosensors and ionic skins). As a result, in recent years, applications in tissue engineering, drug delivery, electrophoresis and physiology have been developed. As we look into the future of bioelectronics, “living” electronics that merge the synthetic and biological world, holds some interest.

Separate to the above, microplastics composed of various plastic and polymeric materials pose as a major global environmental issue that can cause detrimental consequences to marine organisms and across the food chain. We have been collaborating with researchers at UW to identify microplastics in marine organisms in the Puget Sound and have identified that not all organisms consume the same microplastics.

In both projects, we seek to initiate collaborations with those at OIST and look forward to initiating discussions with various units.  

Date

Tuesday, November 23, 2021 - 18:30 to 19:00

Ph.D Thesis Presentation for External by Sam Ross

 

 

 

Date

Wednesday, November 17, 2021 - 12:10 to 12:50

Title: How do quantum systems see each other?

Abstract: I will discuss what happens when you use quantum systems as frames of reference and how this might help us understand more about the structure of spacetime in a theory that encompasses both quantum and relativity theory.

https://groups.oist.jp/faculty-lunch

 

Date

Friday, December 17, 2021 - 09:00 to 10:00

PhD Thesis Public Presentation  

Date

Monday, October 25, 2021 (All day)

Oct 25 - Oct 29 Mathias Mikkelsen (Post-doc, Kindai University, Japan)

Date

Wednesday, November 24, 2021 - 16:00 to 17:00

PhD Public Presentation

Date

Friday, December 3, 2021 - 09:00 to 10:00

PhD Public Presentation 

Date

Friday, October 8, 2021 - 16:30
 
[VENUE AND TIME CHANGE] Please feel free to join us for the continuation of fortnightly MEEJC, this Friday, 4.30pm, Seaside House, Recreation Lounge.
 
This week we are invited to join for discussion on this recent preprint:
 
Functional repertoire convergence of distantly related eukaryotic plankton lineages revealed by genome-resolved metagenomics
https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.10.15.341214v2

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