New Government Policies

OIST has formulated OIST Action Plans based on new Japanese government policies.

1) The Bill on Promotion of Women's Participation and Advancement in the Workplace and OIST Action Plan
2) Act on Advancement of Measures to Support Raising the Next-Generation Children and OIST Action Plan


 

1) The Bill on Promotion of Women's Participation and Advancement in the Workplace

New Japanese law, “Bill on Promotion of Women's Participation and Advancement in the Workplace” enacted in August 2015 calls for implementing policies to promote women’s participation and advancement in the workplace.

National and local government agencies and private-sector corporations are required to collect and analyze the data on gender and working conditions, develop action plans including numerical targets, and publically disclose the plan and the data*.

*Required for private-sector corporations with more than 301 regular employees. Private sector corporations with 300 or less regular employees are required to make best efforts, considering the administrative burden
 

The Process of Formulating an Action Plan

<Step 1>  Collect and analyze the current status, and identify the issues
The basic data (FY2004) to be collected on:
■ Percentage of female workers in the newly hired employees
■ Average years of continuous service by gender (for workers who have been at OIST for 5 years or more)
■ Average hours of overtime per worker per month
■ Percentage of female in managerial positions

<Step 2>  Formulate an action plan, and publicize it internally and externally
■ Set objectives based on the issues identified, develop an implementation plan to achieve those objectives, and fill out the prescribed action pan form.  ※ It is required to set at least 1 or more objectives.
■ Inform all OIST staff about the action plan → TIDA
■ Post the action plan by April 2016 → OIST external website

<Step 3>  Submit a report
Submit the OIST action plan to the Prefectural Labor  Bureau within 3 months.

<Step 4>  Implement the action plan and review progress
On a regular basis, review progress on the objectives set in the action plan.

For more details, please go to the website of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan (Japanese only).

 

2) Act on Advancement of Measures to Support Raising the Next-Generation Children

The “Act on Advancement of Measures to Support Raising the Next-Generation Children” has been in force since April 1, 2005, clarifying the responsibilities of the state, local governments, companies and citizens to prepare an environment where the next generation of children - who will lead the society in the future - are born and raised in the healthy environment.

Under this law, companies are supposed to formulate a “General Business Owner Action Plan” to develop the work environment that supports their employees raising children. Companies with 101 or more employees in regular employment are obligated to formulate this plan and notify their prefectural Labour Bureau of their plans (Companies with less than 100 employees are obligated to make an effort to formulate the plan).

What is a General Business Owner Action Plan?

■ A general business owner action plan is a plan that a company formulates for employees to manage both work and child rearing based on the Act on Advancement of Measures to Support Raising Next-Generation Children.

■ The action plan addresses the development of a sustainable working environment that enables their employees to manage both work and child rearing by providing diverse working conditions and including participation of employees who are not raising children.
The Plan must establish:
  [1] Plan period
  [2] Targets
  [3] Details of measures to achieve targets and the implementation schedule

■ Companies with 101 or more employees in regular employment are obligated to formulate and notify the authorities of their action plans, to inform their employees, and to publically post the information. (Companies with up to 100 employees are obliged to make an effort to formulate plans.)

For more details, please go to the website of the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare of Japan (Japanese only).